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31 Jul



Austria
 Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 20:30 
SALZBURG CONTEMPORARY • ISLAM • ŒNM
Salzburger Festspiele
various, Salzburg, Austria
Austria
ttel.: +43-662-8045-500
http://www.salzburgfestival.at/
info@salzburgfestival.at

Titus Engel, Conductor
EXPERIMENTAL STUDIO of the SWR
œnm . österreichisches ensemble für neue musik
Pier Damiano Peretti, Organ


The central figure of the three concerts is the Sufi master and martyr Mansur Al-Hallağ, born ca. 858, whose radical views on faith attracted an immense number of followers among the people of Iran and Iraq on the one hand: up to 4,000 people would congregate to hear him preach. On the other hand, he made implacable enemies among the powerful and among orthodox Muslims, who accused him of heresy, made him languish in prison for years and finally executed him brutally in 922. Al-Hallağ preached love as the only way towards freedom, and he was convinced of the possibility of each person’s union with god. Right until his violent end, which he is said to have accepted with a smile, he claimed: ‘I am truth.’
His last words, reported by his followers, form the basis of Hossam Mahmoud’s composition Seelenfäden, or Soul Threads. The composer, born in Cairo in 1965, has promoted cultural dialogue for years; his work tells an Islamic story which gives the listener insights into this world and is told by Sufi musicians and singers, Salzburg’s Bach Choir and the Austrian new music ensemble oenm.
The Palestinian-Israeli composer Samir Odeh-Tamimi, born in 1970, who has engaged in an intensive exploration of Koran recitation and rituals rooted in Islam for several years now, is also fascinated by Al-Hallağ: ‘He is among the most important philosophers and poets of Islamic mysticism; his texts and poems are influential to this day. In my work for the Salzburg Festival, I react not only to his poems, but also to his personality. The instrumentation (for large choir, four brass players and two percussionists) allows me to divide singers and musicians into different groups and distribute them throughout the space – this is reminiscent of traditional Sufi rituals in which those praying slowly move in a circle, playing certain rhythms on various percussion instruments. In my new work, however, not the singers, but the sound it-self will move through the space, taking into account the special circumstances at Salzburg’s Kollegienkirche.’
The third world premiere of this focus is a contribution by the Egyptian composer Amr Okba, who currently divides his time between Vienna and Cairo. Born in 1972, he also draws on his musical roots for inspiration. His symphonic poem composed for Salzburg is based on the novel Rhadopis of Nubia by Nobel Prize winner Naguib Mahfouz, set in ancient Egypt. According to the composer, its subject is ‘the responsibility and loyalty of rulers towards their subjects, and how religion and faith can be abused for political purposes – in this case, by the priests’.


Samir Odeh-Tamini : Cihangir for ensemble
Amr Okba : Rhadopis, symphonic poem for ensemble
Zeynep Gedizlioglu : Kesik
Hossam Mahmoud : Tarab 5 for organ, string quartet and wind instruments
Marc Andre : üg for ensemble and electronics

1 Aug 
 
2 Aug 
 
3 Aug 
 
4 Aug



Austria
 Monday, August 04, 2014 at 8.30pm 
SALZBURG CONTEMPORARY • RIHM • KLANGFORUM WIEN
Salzburger Festspiele
various, Salzburg, Austria
Austria
ttel.: +43-662-8045-500
http://www.salzburgfestival.at/
info@salzburgfestival.at

Sylvain Cambreling, Conductor
Susanne Otto, Contralto
Noa Frenkel, Contralto
Klangforum Wien

As a child, Wolfgang Rihm wanted to be a painter, then a writer and finally a composer. Entire groups of works illustrate his close relationship with the visual arts, while numerous artist friendships give testament to the constant flow of energy between Wolfgang Rihm and painting.
His anti-cyclical ‘over-painting’ of works that seem to grow from one germ cell has led to large-scale open series and complexes of works. Starting with his Chiffren and Tutuguri cycles from the 1980s, Rihm made it clear that in his flow of music, form generates itself from beginnings and endings of music. The works Gedrängte Form and Gejagte Form, all the way to his Jagden und Formen (1995–2001), are eloquent examples of this, already evoking the principle of continuous shaping within their titles.
By now, there are three of Rihm’s Will Sound works: Will Sound More (2005/2011) is clearly differentiated from the wild movement of its predecessor Will Sound (2005) by its lyrical moments. ‘Something will sound because it wants to sound’, Rihm wrote about this: ‘The composer follows the will and the process of becoming and notates the spaces in between. The result is a form which reflects the energy wanting to shape itself.’ Expanding the work further, the composer has written Will Sound More Again, first performed in October 2011. With their free interplay of musical forces and their existence-affirming attitude, these Will Sound works are also an extension of his Jagden und Formen into a new complex of works.
The world premiere of a new piano concerto by Wolfgang Rihm is an event to look forward to particularly. Rihm began to compose piano music as a teenager. A first piano concerto is dated 1969. One year later and for a period of one decade exactly, he created seven very different and expansive piano works which set standards in contemporary piano literature on account of their playing technique, sensuality of sound, energy and aesthetics. Nachstudie for piano (1992/1994), lasting almost half an hour and placing enormous demands on the pianist as a whole, can be considered the crowning highlight of his piano oeuvre so far.
The entire experience of his life as a composer so far, all his studies of tradition – despite all outside interference – and all his visions for the history of piano music, far from complete: Wolfgang Rihm will bring them all to bear on his new piano concerto for pianist Tzimon Barto. One thing we can be sure of: musical balance will be attained through great arches of tension, through an audible ‘cutting into one’s own flesh’ and an articulation of tradition ‘which can only ever be my tradition’: ‘There are no historical models anymore, but there are positions which define a Now with a view to a Past (not derived from it), allowing us to see the Past as another Now (that of the past).’


Luigi Nono : Guai ai gelidi mostri
Wolfgang Rihm : Will Sound More
Wolfgang Rihm : Gejagte Form for orchestra

5 Aug 
 
6 Aug 
 
7 Aug 
 
8 Aug 
 
9 Aug



Austria
 Saturday, August 09, 2014 at 7.30pm 
SALZBURG CONTEMPORARY • DALBAVIE • ORF RADIO-SYMPHONIEORCHESTER WIEN
Salzburger Festspiele
various, Salzburg, Austria
Austria
ttel.: +43-662-8045-500
http://www.salzburgfestival.at/
info@salzburgfestival.at

Cornelius Meister, Conductor
Philippe Jaroussky, Countertenor
ORF Radio-Symphonieorchester Wien

One part of the series Salzburg contemporary is dedicated to the French composer Marc-André Dalbavie, whose opera Charlotte Salomon will have its world premiere at the Felsenreitschule this year. Dalbavie, born in 1961 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, began his career among the practitioners of Musique spectrale. This movement, also known as Spectralism, began to leave the approaches of serial music behind, turning instead towards the individual tone and analyzing its sound spectrum. Dalbavie, whose teachers included Tristan Murail (represented by his work Winter Fragments (2002) at Klangforum Wien’s concert), typically uses a compositional approach he himself calls ‘morphing’: musical subjects – scales, a chord, a sound field, a rhythmic or melodic figure – develop from each other or evolve into each other, overlapping and resulting in ever-new forms.
Like Stravinsky, whose Octet turned purposefully to the music of past centuries in 1922, marking the beginning of the phase of his output called ‘neo-classicism’, Marc-André Dalbavie makes frequent reference to past epochs. His piece Melodia (2008) for mixed ensemble is based on sound gestures found in Gregorian chant. In Palimpseste (2002) he superimposes his own writing on a madrigal by Carlo Gesualdo which continues to be heard in multiple ways, affecting Dalbavie’s music while being influenced and transformed by the latter. Dalbavie has also explored traditional genres, for example in his Quatuor à cordes, his string quartet from 2012 which will be performed by the Gringolts Quartet. Over the course of the years, he has written numerous instrumental concertos, including those for violin and piano, as well as Antiphonie, a double concerto for clarinet, basset horn and orchestra. In 2006 he wrote his Flute Concerto (revised in 2007) which uses the reduced instrumentation of orchestras of Mozart’s era; this will be performed by the Mozarteum Orchestra. Furthermore, there are concertos for orchestra such as Color (2001), Ciaccona (2002) and Concertate il suono (2007).
Dalbavie has always been interested in the human voice. In 2008 he wrote Sonnets de Louise Labé, setting poems by the French 16th century poet; Philippe Jaroussky, the cycle’s dedicatee, will interpret the work together with the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra. Many facets of Marc-André Dalbavie’s oeuvre will be highlighted in Salzburg; the transparency and distinctive sound effects of his works, which can develop a tantalizing allure, along with his unmistakable personal style, have made him one of the most frequently performed contemporary composers.


Marc-Andre Dalbavie : La Source d’un regard
Marc-Andre Dalbavie : Sonnets de Louise Labé for countertenor and orchestra
Anton Bruckner : Symphony No. 1 in C minor

10 Aug 
 
11 Aug



Austria
 Monday, August 11, 2014 at 7.30pm 
SALZBURG CONTEMPORARY • DALBAVIE • MOZARTEUM ORCHESTRA SALZBURG
Salzburger Festspiele
various, Salzburg, Austria
Austria
ttel.: +43-662-8045-500
http://www.salzburgfestival.at/
info@salzburgfestival.at

Christoph Eschenbach, Conductor
Mathieu Dufour, Flute
Dimitri Maslennikov, Cello
Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg

One part of the series Salzburg contemporary is dedicated to the French composer Marc-André Dalbavie, whose opera Charlotte Salomon will have its world premiere at the Felsenreitschule this year. Dalbavie, born in 1961 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, began his career among the practitioners of Musique spectrale. This movement, also known as Spectralism, began to leave the approaches of serial music behind, turning instead towards the individual tone and analyzing its sound spectrum. Dalbavie, whose teachers included Tristan Murail (represented by his work Winter Fragments (2002) at Klangforum Wien’s concert), typically uses a compositional approach he himself calls ‘morphing’: musical subjects – scales, a chord, a sound field, a rhythmic or melodic figure – develop from each other or evolve into each other, overlapping and resulting in ever-new forms.
Like Stravinsky, whose Octet turned purposefully to the music of past centuries in 1922, marking the beginning of the phase of his output called ‘neo-classicism’, Marc-André Dalbavie makes frequent reference to past epochs. His piece Melodia (2008) for mixed ensemble is based on sound gestures found in Gregorian chant. In Palimpseste (2002) he superimposes his own writing on a madrigal by Carlo Gesualdo which continues to be heard in multiple ways, affecting Dalbavie’s music while being influenced and transformed by the latter. Dalbavie has also explored traditional genres, for example in his Quatuor à cordes, his string quartet from 2012 which will be performed by the Gringolts Quartet. Over the course of the years, he has written numerous instrumental concertos, including those for violin and piano, as well as Antiphonie, a double concerto for clarinet, basset horn and orchestra. In 2006 he wrote his Flute Concerto (revised in 2007) which uses the reduced instrumentation of orchestras of Mozart’s era; this will be performed by the Mozarteum Orchestra. Furthermore, there are concertos for orchestra such as Color (2001), Ciaccona (2002) and Concertate il suono (2007).
Dalbavie has always been interested in the human voice. In 2008 he wrote Sonnets de Louise Labé, setting poems by the French 16th century poet; Philippe Jaroussky, the cycle’s dedicatee, will interpret the work together with the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra. Many facets of Marc-André Dalbavie’s oeuvre will be highlighted in Salzburg; the transparency and distinctive sound effects of his works, which can develop a tantalizing allure, along with his unmistakable personal style, have made him one of the most frequently performed contemporary composers.


Joseph Haydn : Symphony No. 21 in A, Hob. I:21
Marc-Andre Dalbavie : Concerto for Flute and Orchestra (2006, rev. 2007)
Marc-Andre Dalbavie : Suite for Cello and Orchestra (2013)
Ludwig Van Beethoven : Symphony No. 1 in C, Op. 21

12 Aug 
 
13 Aug 
 
14 Aug 
 
15 Aug



Austria
 Friday, August 15, 2014 at 7.30pm 
Toronto Symphony Orchestra
Grafenegg Auditorium
3485 Grafenegg 10 Österreich
Austria
+43 (0)1 586 83 83
http://www.grafenegg.com
tickets@tonkuenstler.at

Toronto Symphony Orchestra, orchestra
Jörg Widmann, clarinet
Peter Oundjian, conductor

The acclaimed Toronto Symphony Orchestra under its long-standing Music Director Peter Oundjian and Jörg Widmann are converging on the Wolkenturm for a compelling musical encounter. The Composer in Residence makes an appearance as the evening’s soloist in Weber’s world-famous First Clarinet Concerto, before going on to perform his own «Elegy» for Clarinet and Orchestra. Rachmaninov’s Symphonic Dances, written in affectionate remembrance of his native Russia and the last work to be completed by the composer, bring the concert to a romantic conclusion.

Carl Maria von Weber : Overture to the Opera «Oberon»
Carl Maria von Weber : Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra No. 1 in f minor op. 73
Joerg Widmann : «Elegy» for Clarinet and Orchestra
Sergei Rachmaninov : Symphonic Dances op. 45

16 Aug 
 
17 Aug



Austria
 Sunday, August 17, 2014 at 11am 
Buchbinder & Friends
Grafenegg Auditorium
3485 Grafenegg 10 Österreich
Austria
+43 (0)1 586 83 83
http://www.grafenegg.com
tickets@tonkuenstler.at

PERFORMERS
Rudolf Buchbinder, piano
Georgy Goryunov, cello
Stefan Schilli, oboe
Jörg Widmann, clarinet
Bence Bogányi, bassoon
Radek Baborák, horn

Sunday could hardly begin more harmoniously: Following their great success in 2013, the matinees in Grafenegg are now entering their second year. Host Rudolf Buchbinder performs with outstanding chamber music partners from internationally acclaimed orchestras, including the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, the Munich Philharmonic and the Tonkünstler Orchestra Niederösterreich. Jörg Widmann is on hand as composer and clarinettist; his Quintet for Winds and Piano opens the matinee, which is rounded off n classical style with music by Beethoven and Mozart.

Joerg Widmann : Quintet for Oboe, Clarinet, Horn, Bassoon and Piano
Ludwig Van Beethoven : Trio for Clarinet, Violoncello and Piano No. 4 B-flat major op. 11
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart : Quintet for Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn and Piano in E-flat major KV 452

17 Aug



Austria
 Sunday, August 17, 2014 at 7.30pm 
TRPCESKI, PETRENKO
Grafenegg Auditorium
3485 Grafenegg 10 Österreich
Austria
+43 (0)1 586 83 83
http://www.grafenegg.com
tickets@tonkuenstler.at

European Union Youth Orchestra, orchestra
Simon Trpceski, piano
Vasily Petrenko, conductor

For the first time in 2014, the European Union Youth Orchestra (EUYO) is also performing as part of the Grafenegg Festival, whilst away from the stage it will be honing its orchestral skills still further at the Academy. Both the prelude and the main concert feature music by Jörg Widmann, before the EUYO flies across the Atlantic to bring George Gershwin, Leonard Bernstein and John Adams back to Grafenegg. Conducting the EUYO is Vasily Petrenko, Principal Conductor of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. The evening’s soloist is Simon Trpceski, a rising star of the international piano scene. After the concert, the EUYO winds down the evening with a Late Night Session.

Joerg Widmann : «Con brio» Concert Overture for Orchestra after motifs by Ludwig van Beethoven
George Gershwin : Rhapsody in Blue
John Adams : The Chairman Dances Foxtrot for Orchestra
Leonard Bernstein : Symphonic Dances from the Musical «West Side Story»

18 Aug 
 
19 Aug 
 
20 Aug 
 
21 Aug



Austria
 Thursday, August 21, 2014 at 7.30pm 
TILLING, WIDMANN, NAGANO
Grafenegg Auditorium
3485 Grafenegg 10 Österreich
Austria
+43 (0)1 586 83 83
http://www.grafenegg.com
tickets@tonkuenstler.at

Tonkünstler-Orchester Niederösterreich, orchestra
Camilla Tilling, soprano
Jörg Widmann, clarinet
Kent Nagano, conductor

The second weekend of the Grafenegg Festival opens with the premiere of the «Babylon-Suite» by Jörg Widmann, based on the opera «Babylon» which premiered at the Bavarian State Opera in Munich in 2012. Conducting that celebrated opera premiere was Kent Nagano, recognised as one of the leading conductors of contemporary music. Afterwards Jörg Widmann performs as soloist in Mozart’s moving Clarinet Concerto. Gustav’s Mahler’s Fourth Symphony, with its famous soprano solo – sung here by Camilla Tilling – brings this evening in Grafenegg to a close.

The concert will be recorded and broadcast on 26 September at 7.30 p.m. on Radio Österreich 1 and on 12 October at 8 pm on Radio Niederösterreich.


Joerg Widmann : Babylon Suite for Large Orchestra
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart : Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra in A major KV 622
Gustav Mahler : Symphony no. 4 in G major

22 Aug 
 
23 Aug 
 

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