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Blog » House of Commons holds debate on the crisis in music education

17 Jul  

Former indie band member and Bury MP James Frith today led a debate on the crisis in English Music Education at Westminster Hall. The event was held with the support and collaboration of UK Music.

The debate was held to highlight the importance of music education in supporting an industry which contributes £4.5 billion to the British economy.

 

Evidence of the crisis includes:

  • 50% of children at independent schools receive sustained music tuition, but the figure is only 15% for state schools
  • 17% of music creators were educated at independent schools, compared to only 7% across the population as a whole
  • OFQUAL statistics on the number of entries between 2014 and 2019 show a decline of 30% in the number of pupils taking A-Level Music.

UK Music is urging the Government to support its plan to combat the crisis facing music in education. 

 

The eight points in its blueprint to halt the decline are: 

  • securing universal access to music within state education;
  • achieving a broad-based music education within curriculum learning;
  • sustained funding;
  • empowering local solutions;
  • improved teacher training and support;
  • incentivising music education in schools through inspections;
  • increasing music facilities for young people outside school hours;
  • and conducting an analysis of music education delivery.

UK Music CEO Michael Dugher said:

“Music in state education is facing an undeniable crisis. All children from every background should have access to music in education - not just those who can access the ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ to pay for instruments and tuition or send them to private schools.”

 

According to a survey of teachers conducted by the BPI in March 2019: 

  • State schools have seen a 21% decrease in music provision over the past 5 years, compared to a net increase of 7% in music provision in independent schools over the same period. Around 30% of state schools have seen a decrease in curriculum time for music, or a reduction in the number of qualified music teachers.
  • Only 12% of the most deprived schools have an orchestra, compared to 85% of independent schools.
  • 1 in 4 schools serving disadvantaged communities offer no music instrument lessons to students that want them.  Almost all independent schools and those serving affluent communities do.
  • Only 64% of schools serving disadvantaged communities give students a chance to take part in a school musical or musical play, compared with 91% of the most affluent state schools and 96% of independent schools.
  • 89% of independent schools run a choir in lunchtime or after-school compared to only 60% of the most disadvantaged state schools.
  • Almost 40% of state-funded secondary schools now have no compulsory music lessons in year 9. Students from disadvantaged communities are least likely to have regular music lessons by age 13/14.
  • Only 44% of music lessons in a primary school are delivered by a music specialist.
  • 1 in 5 primary school teachers report there is no regular music lesson for their class.

Here’s today’s debate in full:



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